Glossary of Judo waza (techniques) terms

Tate-shiho-gatame (Straight four-corner hold)

Tate-shiho-gatame (Straight four-corner hold)

Summary

In this Osae komi waza (Hold-down techniques), the opponent is held down by sitting astride him.

Features of this Waza

The Tate-shiho-gatame (Straight four-corner hold) Waza consists of sitting astride the opponent in order to hold his upper body and legs firmly down.

Waza details

Tori (Player executing technique) places on arm behind Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck, and his other arm around and beneath Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) side, with both arms firmly clasped to each other behind Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck.
Tori (Player executing technique) is in effect hugging both Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) neck and his arm.
With Tori (Player executing technique) upper body pinning him down, Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) must turn his face to the side. This limits the number of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) escape directions, and gives Tori (Player executing technique) an advantage.
Tori (Player executing technique) also clasps his legs together beneath Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) legs, thereby pinning his lower body as well.
Tori (Player executing technique) can pin Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) lower body even more effectively by coiling his ankles around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) ankles and then clasping them together.
This Tate-shiho-gatame (Straight four-corner hold) Waza can also be performed by only pinning Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) from his shoulder to arm.
In yet another method, Tori (Player executing technique) can grasp his own Belt with the hand reaching around Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) arm, instead of clasping both arms together beneath Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack).
The Tate-shiho-gatame (Straight four-corner hold) Waza is relatively easy for even small-statured combatants to use, and is frequently used by both men and women in actual competitions, regardless of rank.