Glossary of Judo waza (techniques) terms

Kami-shiho-gatame (Top four-corner hold)

Kami-shiho-gatame (Top four-corner hold)

Summary

This is the most frequently used Ne waza (Ground techniques).

Features of this Waza

In the Kami-shiho-gatame (Top four-corner hold) Waza, Tori (Player executing technique) lies with his upper body covering the supine Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) from directly above his head, and uses both arms and his body to hold Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) down.

Waza details

With Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) supine, Tori (Player executing technique) lays his upper body over him from directly above Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) head, sliding both his arms beneath Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) shoulders to firmly grasp both sides of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Belt.
When moving into this hold, Tori (Player executing technique) must take care not to grasp the sides of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Belt by reaching over Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) arms instead of beneath his shoulders, as this will leave both of Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) arms raised and free.
After grasping Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) Belt with both hands, Tori (Player executing technique) keeps his arms tightly at his sides and presses his stomach against Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) face.
Tori (Player executing technique) does this by thrusting out his chest to hold Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) down, and by spreading his legs wide to maintain balance.
Because Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) may try to escape by thrusting both hands upward while moving and twisting his body, Tori (Player executing technique) must keep his arms tightly at his sides in order to keep Uke (Player receiving opponent's attack) arms locked.
The Kami-shiho-gatame (Top four-corner hold) Waza is used frequently in competition by both men and women, and regardless of rank.
This Waza is more stable than the Kesa-gatame (Scarf hold), and therefore favors small-statured combatants.